The facial skin is left with scars from the lesions sometimes.

This, too, is rarely permanent and isn’t a scar although it can be up to eighteen a few months before the pores and skin brings itself back to normal. Chemical peeling may lessen the time frame but should be used only in acute cases. There are two types of acne scarring: a sunken region and thick, raised cells known as keloids. Occasionally these scars will repair themselves as time passes and disappear or appear barely noticeable however, many need additional treatment if they really bother a person. There are a variety of treatments for acne scarring and no one treatment is right for everybody. Continue reading The facial skin is left with scars from the lesions sometimes.

Because errors in recombination can possess catastrophic consequences.

Having less 53BP1 avoided the proper reshuffling of genetic material during recombination. Whenever a section of genetic materials is cut loose to become recombined, it must be quickly reattached if not it dangers migrating to another chromosome in a process called translocation, a common cause of cancer. In regular VJ recombination, that will not happen, but sometimes the genetic material that is being reshuffled has to travel to a comparatively distant place on its chromosome. The researchers found that that procedure for long-distance DNA end-joining, happened 2.5 times much less often in mice that lacked 53BP1. Related StoriesStudy reports discovery of new class of DNA fix enzymeUAB researcher awarded NIH grant to study pathogenesis of thrombotic microangiopathyResearchers reveal how charged gold nanoparticles influence framework of DNA and RNAAnd, when recombination falters, significant consequences follow. Continue reading Because errors in recombination can possess catastrophic consequences.

Lisa Rosenbaum.

So EHRs will be only as good as the product quality metrics they’re designed to capture; technology can’t get over fundamental measurement issues. We measure a lot of things that have no worth to patients, while much of what individuals do worth, including our interest, remains unmeasurable. Why, Wachter asks, do we do nothing comparable in health care? In a moving passage, Wachter speaks with a renowned surgeon who once spent his evenings before surgery reading his notes on another day’s patients. No longer. His notes have already been rendered homogeneous by the tyranny of clicks and auto-populated fields uselessly. I can’t actually picture their faces. The blanks on our screens could be filled with words, but the process of understanding cannot be auto-populated. Continue reading Lisa Rosenbaum.